Automated robotic drill set to save surgical time

Looking at the current time-consuming scenarios taking place in the operation theaters, the scientists from the University of Utah have developed an automated robotic drill machine that will help the surgeons save a lot of time. The new technology reduces the time spent on the procedures from two hours to about two and a half minutes that is normally required during the complex surgical procedures.

According to William Couldwell, a neurosurgeon, AK Balaji and a group of other researchers are behind this hobbyhorse. Using the robot-aided drill the doctors can reduce the human error risk rate, infection risk, surgical expenditure, and also the time required by making a fast; precise; clean; and safe drill, cut, or opening during the surgery. It is considered to be 50% faster than the conventional and standard hand-used procedures, which are not only complex but also risky in terms of infection and sanitary conditions.

The automated robotic technology has built-in software that helps the machine perform its task with great precision and accuracy. The software is programmed further based on the information obtained from the CT scan of the patients. In addition to this, the other major dynamics such as the important and sensitive nerve points as well as the major arteries and the veins and the bone information are also taken into consideration by the device software.

The use of the robotic drill was firstly executed during a translabyrinthine surgery in which the slow-growing benign tumors, present in the ear’s auditory nerves, are exposed for carrying out the further processes. The use of this technology helps cut down the risk of damaging the highly sensitive areas such as the venous sinus veins and facial nerves. In case if the device comes in contact with the sensitive areas or observes any irritation during the specific task, then it shuts down automatically as it has an emergency shut-off switch feature present.

The robotic drill is anticipated to have applications in various other surgical processes in the near future. For now, let’s wait and watch until the product becomes commercial and do stay tuned in for the latest updates.

 

Poonam Bhosale-Gorade undertook the post of Team Lead–Content Writer at Medical Device News, following a 3-year stint as a writer and editor of books, reports, special publications. She holds a BE degree in Information technology from Pune University. Her hobbies include reading books, writing on Quora, trekking, playing badminton, etc. She is currently maintaining her blog Crazy Indian Stories (started recently). She can be reached at: poonam@medicaldevicenews.net